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Review of "Multisystemic cellular tropism of SARS-CoV-2 in autopsies of COVID-19 patients"

Reviewer: Jay Rappaport, Robert V. Blair (Tulane) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

Published onApr 14, 2022
Review of "Multisystemic cellular tropism of SARS-CoV-2 in autopsies of COVID-19 patients"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
Multisystemic cellular tropism of SARS-CoV-2 in autopsies of COVID-19 patients
Description

AbstractBackgroundMultiorgan tropism of SARS-CoV-2 has previously been shown for several major organs.MethodsWe have comprehensively analyzed 25 different formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues/organs from autopsies of fatal COVID-19 cases (n=8), using detailed histopathological assessment, detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA using polymerase chain reaction and RNA in situ hybridization, viral protein using immunohistochemistry, and virus particles using transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we confirmed these findings in an independent external autopsy cohort (n=9).FindingsSARS-CoV-2 RNA was mainly localized in epithelial cells, endothelial and mesenchymal cells across all organs. Next to lung, trachea, kidney, heart, or liver, viral RNA was also found in tonsils, salivary glands, oropharynx, thyroid, adrenal gland, testicles, prostate, ovaries, small bowel, lymph nodes, skin and skeletal muscle. Viral RNA was predominantly found in cells expressing ACE2, TMPRSS2, or both. The SARS-CoV-2 replicating RNA was also detected in these organs. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy were not suitable for reliable and specific SARS-CoV-2 detection in autopsies. The findings were validated using in situ hybridization on external COVID-19 autopsy samples. Finally, apart from the lung, correlation of virus detection and histopathological assessment did not reveal any specific alterations that could be attributed to SARS-CoV-2.InterpretationSARS-CoV-2 could be observed in virtually all organs, colocalizing with ACE2 and TMPRSS2 mainly in epithelial but also in mesenchymal and endothelial cells, and viral replication was found across all organ systems. Apart from the respiratory tract, no specific (histo-)morphologic alterations could be assigned to the SARS-CoV-2 infection.Research in contextEvidence before this studySARS-CoV-2 has been shown to infect the respiratory tract and affect several other major organs. However, on a cellular level, the localization of SARS-CoV-2 and its targets ACE2 and TMPRSS2 have not been described comprehensively.Added value of this studyWe have analyzed tissue SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-PCR and visualized its localization together with ACE2 and TMPRSS2 using in situ hybridization (ISH) in 25 different autopsy tissues. SARS-CoV-2 sense and antisense RNA were detected in 16 tissues/organs, mainly in epithelial cells and, to a lesser extent, in endothelial or stromal cells. Detection of viral protein using immunohistochemistry or viral particles using transmission electron microscopy did not yield specific results. Interestingly, apart from the respiratory tract and specifically the lungs, we have not found a specific pathology that would be associated with extrapulmonary viral spread.Implications of all the available evidenceWe provide a recommendation on using these methods in autopsy diagnostics for SARS-CoV-2. Our data extend the current hypothesis of severe COVID-19 being multisystemic diseases. Our data also provide clear evidence of infection and replication of SARS-CoV-2 in the endothelial cell across all organs, extending the hypothesis on the (micro)vascular involvement in COVID-19.

To read the original manuscript, click the link above.

Since our solicitation of reviews, this preprint has been published in Cell journal and the link to the published manuscript can be found here.

Reviewer 1 (Jay Rappaport & Robert V. Blair) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

To read the review, click the link below. 

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