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Reviews of "Obesity may hamper SARS-CoV-2 vaccine immunogenicity"

Reviewers: Jonathan Hare (IAVI) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️ • Carlota Dobaño (ISGLOBAL: Instituto de Salud Global de Barcelona) | 📒📒📒◻️◻️

Published onMay 07, 2021
Reviews of "Obesity may hamper SARS-CoV-2 vaccine immunogenicity"
key-enterThis Pub is a Review of
OBESITY MAY HAMPER SARS-CoV-2 VACCINE IMMUNOGENICITY
Description

ABSTRACTBackgroundThe first goal of the study was to analyse the antibody titre 7 days after the second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine in a group of 248 healthcare workers (HCW). The second goal was to analyse how the antibody titre changes in correlation with age, gender and BMI.MethodsParticipants were assigned to receive the priming dose at baseline and booster dose at day 21. Blood and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected at baseline and 7 days after second dose of vaccine.Findings248 HWCs were analysed, 158 women (63.7%) and 90 men (36.3%). After the second dose of BNT162b2 vaccine, 99.5% of participants developed a humoral immune response.The geometric mean concentration of antibodies among the vaccinated subjects after booster dose (285.9 AU/mL 95% CI: 249.5-327.7); was higher than that of human convalescent sera (39.4 AU/mL, 95% CI: 33.1-46.9), with p<0.0001. The antibody titre was found to be higher in young and female participants. A strong correlation of BMI classes with antibody titres was noticed: humoral response was more efficient in the group with under- and normal-weight vs the group with pre- and obesity participants (p<0.0001 at T1).InterpretationThese findings imply that females, lean and young people have an increased capacity to mount humoral immune responses compared to males, overweight and the older population. Although further studies are needed, this data may have important implications for the development of vaccination strategies for COVID-19, particularly in obese people.FundingNone

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Summary of Reviews: This paper presents potentially important information about the effects of obesity on vaccine immunogenecity, but reviewers find that the analysis needs substantial clarification and the claims should be presented in the context of the lack of clinical outcomes data.

Reviewer 1 (Jonathan Hare) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

Reviewer 2 (Carlota Dobaño) | 📒📒📒 ◻️◻️

RR:C19 Strength of Evidence Scale Key

📕 ◻️◻️◻️◻️ = Misleading

📙📙 ◻️◻️◻️ = Not Informative

📒📒📒 ◻️◻️ = Potentially Informative

📗📗📗📗◻️ = Reliable

📘📘📘📘📘 = Strong

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